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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T V W

This course involves an overview of both human geography and physical geography. Topics include population, natural resources, geophysical hazards, weathering and erosion, rocks, and weather.

As an introduction to Environmental Studies, this course provides a scientific overview of important global and local environmental problems. The course examines the major ecosystems of the world and considers how changes in human activities, technology and population growth affect the health of natural ecosystems. (3,0,0)

Credits:
3.0

This course provides an introduction of the various sub-fields of human geography. It provides a solid foundation for students who are interested in pursuing a career in urban planning, politics, economics, teaching and social sciences. Some of the topics examined include map use, populations and cultures, political systems, spatial behaviour,...

Credits:
3.0

Geography 112 is an introduction to the concepts and practices of community, regional, resource, environmental and land use planning. We will discuss what constitutes planning and will define its role in the development of sustainable communities and regions. The course will emphasize the participation of the public, politicians, resource...

Credits:
3.0

An interesting overview of the physical environment and its relationship to human culture and impacts of human activities. Principal topics covered include: cartography and remote sensing, meteorology, climatology, global environmental problems, and biogeography. Laboratory experience will focus on map skills and methods in meteorology and...

Credits:
3.0

Geography 160 is the second half of an introductory course in physical geography. Subjects covered in this term include landforms, weathering, mass movement, plate tectonics, igneous processes, glaciers, river systems, costal processes, and soils. Laboratories will include rock and mineral identification, plate tectonics, topographical and...

Credits:
3.0

Environmental climatology is an examination of the boundary layer climate and its impact upon the microclimates of ecosystems throughout the world. Discussion includes both natural systems and modified features and examines the impacts of microclimatic changes initiated by human activities. Laboratories include methodology in measurement of...

Credits:
3.0

Examination of the environmental factors that control the distribution and development of ecosystems, including climatic and geological change. The course emphasizes plant ecology, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, ecosystem strategies relative to soil and climatic conditions, and includes discussion of the effects of disturbance and...

Credits:
3.0

Geomorphology is a one-semester course that examines the natural processes that shape the face of the Earth. It develops on some of the material covered in NWCC Geography 160. The lecture part of the course will emphasize the fundamental principles that form the basis of geomorphology, in particular the processes that are active in the natural...

Credits:
3.0

Introduction to the theory and practical applications of analytic techniques used to study spatial information in Geography and other disciplines. The types of spatial data that exist together with methods of collection in the field and analysis of spatial data using statistical methods are examined. Concepts associated with integrating spatial...

Credits:
3.0

Examination in detail of hydrological processes and their relationships to ecosystems structures, soils and watersheds. Lectures, laboratories and field work will emphasize the impacts of natural processes, management and disturbance upon the hydrological balance and the characteristic reactions and properties of specific soil types to...

Credits:
3.0

Geography 210 allows students to examine the environmental problems of today’s world in the context of different societies and societal responses. In this course, we will identify how individuals and cultures view key environmental issues, how we can objectively analyze these problems, and how solutions can be derived to mitigate or solve...

Credits:
3.0

Food is a necessary component of life and the need to eat is the most basic and important of all human drives. The central place of food in our lives has made food one of the made focal points of human existence. How we grow, process, distribute and consume our food defines us as a society. The production of food changes landscapes, the...

Credits:
3.0

This course aims to explore the reflexive relationship between society and space. As the social organization of society has spatial consequences so, too, does the spatial organization affect our understanding of the relationships between social groups. These relations are negotiated and contested in different spaces at different times. This...

Credits:
3.0

Economic Geography investigates the concepts, theories, and principles which determine the spatial arrangement and organization of economic activities and processes. A global approach is taken, emphasizing the interdependencies of local and regional economies within multinational settings, including the spatial patterns of economic success and...

Credits:
3.0

A regional geographical exploration of the people, places, and landscapes of the world’s realms: Europe, Russia, Middle East, North Africa, Asia, Pacific, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and North America. (3,0,0)

Credits:
3.0

Using the concepts and methods of regional geography, this course examines British Columbia in terms of the patterns of its physical and human landscapes. The interaction of climate geology, biogeography, history, resource utilization, settlement and economic activities are the foundation for discussion of the regions of B.C. and the...

Credits:
3.0

This regional geography course examines Canada in terms of the patterns of its physical and human landscapes. The interaction of climate, geology, biogeography, history, resource utilization, settlement and economic activities are utilized in the discussion of the regionalization of Canada and the resulting interregional and international...

Credits:
3.0

This course will examine how the different cultures in northwestern British Columbia provide unique perspectives on the relationship between people and the environments they inhabit. An overriding theme of this course will be the power and idea of Land and Place from both a geographical and cultural perspective. In addition, the course will...

Credits:
3.0