Programs & Courses
Financial Aid
Media

All Courses

See All Course Outlines »
A B C D E F G H I J L M N O P R S T V W

This course provides a general introduction to the field of biology. Topics include the methods of science, evolution, classification, the cell, an overview of the major groups of living things, and ecology. This course includes a laboratory component. 

Credits:
4.0

The course involves a systematic study of human anatomy and physiology with addition of a section on cell structure and function, genetics and metabolic processes and includes a laboratory component. This is a human biology course intended for students who require a Provincial Level (Grade 12) standing in Biology.  

Credits:
4.0

Basic introductory course in general biology. The course covers the diversity of life, introductory biochemistry and cell biology and introductory animal and plant physiology. Laboratories include the scientific method, microscopy and major kingdoms of organisms. Experimental techniques and observation skills are emphasized. (3,3,0)

Credits:
3.0

Continuation of BIOL 101. The course covers genetics, evolution and ecology. Laboratories include genetics, reproduction and development, evolutionary processes and ecology. Field trips, including a two-day weekend trip, may be held. (3,3,0)

Credits:
3.0

Examination of the principals of biology with reference to the human body. The structural organization of the body starting with cells and tissues proceeding to the major body systems including nervous, muscle, skeletal, and integumentary system is examined. (3,3,0)

Credits:
3.0

Continuation of BIOL 131. Examination of the principles of biology with reference to the human body. The course examines the physiology of the body including the functions and regulations of the cardiovascular, endocrine, lymphatic, nervous and reproductive systems, and how these systems interact to maintain homeostasis, levels of metabolism...

Credits:
3.0

The course covers the biology involved in the study of microorganisms and their relation to human health and disease. The topics include bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and helminthes as well as viruses and disease causing prions. Microbial genetics, recombinant DNA and biotechnological applications are examined. The epidemiology of disease...

Credits:
3.0

Biology 191 is designed to introduce non-Biology majors to the concepts and scientific principles associated with ecological systems. The principles of the biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems will be discussed, including energy flows, biogeochemical cycles, soils, structure of ecosystems, biodiversity, population and community ecology,...

Credits:
3.0

Introduction to the invertebrate phyla. It provides an overview of the structure, function, evolution, diversity and ecology of invertebrate animals by examining the increasing complexity in form and function in the invertebrates and their evolutionary and ecological relationships. Examples emphasize marine, terrestrial and freshwater aquatic...

Credits:
3.0

Introduction to the chordates, in particular the Subphylum Vertebrata. It provides an overview of the structure, function, evolution, diversity and ecology of vertebrate animals. The increasing complexity in structure and function o f tissue and organ systems and the relationships between the various levels of vertebrate complexity will be...

Credits:
3.0

Non-vascular Plants and Fungi is an examination of the biology of algae, fungi, lichens, and bryophytes. The material covered for each group includes morphology, physiology, origins, evolution, life history, economic uses, and ecology. Slide shows and local examples will bring color and interest to the classroom. Labs will involve dissections,...

Examination of the biology of algae, fungi, lichens and bryophytes, including discussions of their origins, evolution, ecology and physiology. Laboratories will include examination of local flora wherever possible. Field trips may be scheduled. (3,3,0)

Credits:
3.0

A survey of the vascular plants including ferns and fern allies, conifers and other gymnosperms, and flowering plants. Cell structure and tissues of vascular plants are discussed as they relate to plant function. The origin and evolution of vascular plant structures and groups is emphasized. Laboratory studies will emphasize local plants and...

Credits:
3.0

Detailed examination of all levels of cell structure and function. Emphasis is placed upon the dynamic processes at the cellular level. Topics considered include biotechnology, prokaryote/eukaryote cells, membrane models, cell walls, cytoplasmic organelles, the nucleus, cell cycle and nucleocytoplasmic interactions. Laboratories emphasize...

Credits:
3.0

Examination of the fundamental principles of biochemistry, including protein structure and enzyme functions, cell energetics, biosynthesis, and mechanisms which control cell metabolism. The laboratories include detailed experimental analyses of the molecular functions of cells and tissues and methods of molecular biology. (3,3,0)

Credits:
3.0

An introduction to the major groups of land plants, including mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, and the flowering plant. Diversity, evolution and adaptation are major themes of the course. Students will learn the basic principles of reproduction and development, morphology, and physiology. Ecological interactions and responses to the environment will...

Credits:
3.0

In-depth examination of basic ecological principles, including population and community ecology, food chains, succession, species diversity, genetic strategies, genetic diversity and impacts of management and disturbance on populations and communities. Discussions will include freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecology. May include field...

Credits:
3.0

Introductory Biology: bacteria, viruses, protozoa; requirements and control of bacterial growth; molecular genetics and biotechnology. Microbial ecology: methods, habitat, nutrient cycles. Systematics of Bacteria, Archaea, Protozoa. Labs will cover aseptic technique, media preparation, isolation of pure cultures. Counting methods for bacteria...

Credits:
3.0

This course can follow Microbiology I, but can also stand alone as an introduction to microorganisms and how they relate to human activities. Microorganisms are the tools for many profitable industrial applications and central to modern biotechnology. Students will be asked to write and present a term paper on this subject. The relationship of...

Credits:
3.0

This course introduces the student to transmission genetics. Coverage begins with the pattern of inheritance, chromosomes and the process of mapping via recombination analysis. All types of mutations, their causes and effects are discussed followed by a review of gene function. The genetics of Cancer and development are examined and the course...

Credits:
3.0

Pages